What is a Gluteus Medius Muscle

The gluteus medius is a muscle located in the buttocks region of the body. It is one of the three gluteal muscles, along with the gluteus maximus and gluteus minimus. The gluteus medius is responsible for moving the hip and thigh outward, as well as rotating the thigh inward. It also helps to stabilize the pelvis when standing on one leg.

The gluteus medius muscle originates on the outer surface of the ilium bone, and inserts on the greater trochanter of the femur bone. It is innervated by the superior gluteal nerve.

Weakness or imbalances in the gluteus medius can lead to problems with posture and gait, as well as lower back and hip pain. Exercises that target the gluteus medius include side leg raises, clamshells, and single leg squats.

Function of the Gluteus Medius Muscle

The primary function of the gluteus medius muscle is to move the hip and thigh outward, a movement called abduction. This is important for maintaining balance when standing on one leg, such as when walking or running.

The gluteus medius also helps to rotate the thigh inward, a movement called medial rotation. This movement is important for proper alignment of the legs and pelvis when walking or running.

In addition to these movement functions, the gluteus medius also plays a role in stabilizing the pelvis when standing on one leg. It works with other muscles in the hip and pelvis to maintain proper alignment and balance.

Weakness or imbalances in the gluteus medius can lead to problems with posture and gait, as well as lower back and hip pain. Exercises that target the gluteus medius, such as side leg raises, clamshells, and single leg squats, can help to strengthen and improve the function of this muscle.

Common Issues with a Gluteus Medius Muscle

Some common issues that may arise with the gluteus medius muscle include:

  1. Weakness: The gluteus medius muscle can become weak due to lack of use or disuse, leading to problems with balance and stability. This can cause issues with gait and posture, as well as contribute to lower back and hip pain.
  2. Imbalance: If one side of the gluteus medius muscle is stronger or weaker than the other, it can lead to imbalances that can affect posture and gait. This can also contribute to lower back and hip pain.
  3. Injuries: The gluteus medius muscle can become strained or torn due to overuse or sudden impact. This can result in pain and difficulty moving the hip and thigh outward.
  4. Tendinitis: Tendinitis, or inflammation of the tendon, can occur in the gluteus medius muscle. This can cause pain and difficulty with movement.

It is important to address any issues with the gluteus medius muscle in order to maintain proper posture and gait, and prevent pain and injury. This may involve incorporating exercises to strengthen and stretch the muscle into your routine, as well as seeking treatment from a healthcare professional if necessary.

How to stretch your Gluteus Medius Muscle

Here are a few stretches that can help to stretch and lengthen the gluteus medius muscle:

  1. Side-lying leg lift: Lie on your side with your legs stacked on top of each other. Lift the top leg up and down, keeping the foot flexed.
  2. Pigeon pose: From a downward-facing dog position in yoga, bring one leg forward and bend it so the shin is perpendicular to the body. The other leg should be extended behind you, with the top of the foot on the ground. Lower the hips down towards the ground, feeling a stretch in the gluteus medius of the extended leg.
  3. Seated butterfly stretch: Sit on the ground with the soles of your feet touching and your knees bent out to the sides. Sit up tall and use your hands to gently press your knees down towards the ground, feeling a stretch in the inner thighs and gluteus medius muscles.
  4. Lateral lunge: Step out to the side and bend the knee, keeping the other leg straight. Lower your hips down towards the ground, feeling a stretch in the gluteus medius of the bent leg.

Remember to stretch gently and not push yourself too far. It is important to listen to your body and stop if you feel any pain. It is also a good idea to warm up before stretching to help prepare your muscles.

How to Rehab your Gluteus Medius Muscle

Here are a few steps you can take to rehab your sartorius muscle:

  1. Rest: If you have strained or injured your sartorius muscle, it is important to rest the muscle and avoid activities that may further strain or damage it.
  2. Ice: Applying ice to the injured area can help to reduce inflammation and swelling. Apply ice for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day, for the first 48-72 hours after the injury.
  3. Compression: Wearing a compression bandage or wrap can help to reduce swelling and provide support to the injured muscle.
  4. Elevation: Elevating the injured leg above the level of your heart can help to reduce swelling.
  5. Stretching and strengthening exercises: Once the inflammation and swelling have subsided, it is important to start stretching and strengthening exercises to rehab the sartorius muscle. Your physical therapist can help you develop an appropriate exercise program.
  6. Gradually return to activity: When you feel ready, gradually return to your normal activities and sports, taking care not to overdo it and re-injure the muscle.

It is important to follow your healthcare professional’s recommendations for rehabilitating your sartorius muscle. They will be able to advise you on the best course of treatment and help you develop a personalized rehab plan.

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Athlete’s Choice Massage was created to provide consistently excellent rehabilitative services for health-conscious people. Our team is extremely well-trained and they take pride in their work. They are constantly striving to learn and better themselves in their respective fields so that they can help you recover and aid in the maintenance of your well-being.

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